Skip to main content

About your Search

20121202
20121210
SHOW
( more )
STATION
SFGTV 58
SFGTV2 37
MSNBCW 36
CNNW 35
KTVU (FOX) 31
KGO (ABC) 27
KPIX (CBS) 26
FOXNEWS 20
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 19
FBC 17
CSPAN 14
CNBC 9
KICU 9
MSNBC 9
CSPAN2 8
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 471
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 472 (some duplicates have been removed)
.s. law affecting disabled kids. but the treaty would not change u.s. law. in fact, there's no precedent that we can find that any u.n. treaty has ever changed u.s. law. we'll dig deeper on that in a moment. after the vote, cnn asked senator john kerry about santorum's claims. here's what he said. >> i have great respect for both rick and his wife karen and their daughter and their family. he's a strong family man. but he either simply hasn't read the treaty or doesn't understand it, or he was just not factual in what he said because the united nations has absolutely zero -- zero, i mean zero ability to order or to tell or to -- i mean, they can suggest, but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. >> it's not just democrats saying that. in a moment you'll hear from a republican who says the exact same thing. former u.s. attorney dick thornburgh. but the big question that we've been trying to figure out is why? why the flip-flopping and the no-voting based on, as far as we can tell, a boatload of misinformation. well, it turns out i
'll play his response. >>> still ahead tonight, you better stop textin texting. if the government and law enforcement has their way, they may live on for years. we'll exa abou examine about hog brother is about to impede your right of speech. >>> egypt is now burning. where is sandra flack. you don't think that makes sense? the muslim brotherhood are about to trample all over women's rights. where are the women up in arms about the so-called war on women. they stand in silence now. why? ♪ [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> it has become a familiar scene. egyptian citizens flooding the streets demanding their inalienabl
ordinance does and all the proposed ordinance does is fill gaps in state law. state law does not address -- state law was changed 10 years ago to allow an administrative appeal to the board -- to elected body if the elected body is the decision maker. we've had 10 years now of having no procedure in place. this is trying to establish a procedure. so, number one, it's addressing a gap in state law that did not establish procedures for such administrative appeals. secondly, it addresses a gap in state law specifically around exemptions regarding noticing. as ann marie stated, there is absolutely no requirement under state law for noticing exemptions. the noticing that we already have, either by ordinance or by practice goes way beyond anything that state law requires. what this does is aloe exceptionally try to address the fairness question in saying that since there is extensive noticing, it happens on many actions by the city, in particular extensive noticing by anything that this department does, that we want to maximize noticing through using existing noticing. in other words, if there
that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
consistent in domestic violence investigation; there was a time when law enforcement only focused on investigation. chief suhr recognize importance of having advocacy groups located directly in the special victims unit. family can meet with investigators and have access to services in the system as they move forward. with the efforts of kathy black and -- svu has a children's room available which offers a safe environment for children exposed to family violence. child abuse is one of the toughest crimes for investigators. children are among the most vulnerable victims. thankfully there are those like kathy baxter who are constantly fighting for the prevention of child abuse. i believe partnership with outside agencies have allowed us to find justice during this complex investigation. another important component of svu is the -- unit. those members solely on internet crimes against children. the cases are complex and require persistent and dedication to identify and locate perpetrators who possess and distribute child pornography. we are only one of many law enforc
donkey, or lack thereof. i love the picture. it reminded me of a priceless letter he sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
there are some who have said that there are already laws in the books that cover this situation. that is simply not the case. which i whies berkeley, san joÉe and other california cities have their own public nudity restriction beyond the if there were already laws in place to address this situation, i would not have introduced this legislation. public nudity, currently, is not -- is legal in san francisco, other than in our parks, port, and in restaurants. there's been a suggestion that we should use lewd behavior laws, particularly the indecent exposure provisions of the california penal code. i don't agree with that. i think that using lewd behavior laws is problematic and ineffective. first of all, there are going to be a lot of borderline cases about whether something is lewd or not lewd and you're putting a police officer in a terrible position of trying to determine is this person a little bit aroused or not aroused, is that adornment on the person's genitals lewd or not lewd, did he shake his genitals a little too vigorously to draw attention. no police officer should make that determi
with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forward to the rest of the day, i appreciate your presence and i appreciate your leadership
in the united states. they are laws to protect the privacy of patients. what the nurse receptionist did in telling the callers what the condition of the patient was, you know, she had rest all the rest of it that would be impermissible in the united states. and the fact that it was the duke duchess of cambridge i think maybe makes it more egregious. pranks you and i do radio. we have -- you know, sometimes we have fun doing it. but to do it at someone else's expense in this regard is just horrible. now, something said that. i think to pin the suicide of the woman on the radio dj's is really farfetched. i spoke to some doctors today who told me that when someone is bound do kill themselves. the call may be the trigger but something else. to leave a husband and two small children behind there had to be something going on in this poor woman's head. this thing pushed her over the edge. >> laura: geraldo, it's part of the whole problem we have right now. we have a lot of problems in this country. this culture where the more outrageous or the more, i don't know, profane or the more you debase
and workers are standing at the precipice of. with me is syracuse university law professor and pulitzer prize investigative reporter, david johnson, who provides details on how big corporations use plain english to rob you blind. in his book, "the fine print." loretta sanchez, carmin wong-ulrich, and matt welch. so nice to have you all at the table. >> good morning. >> thank you. good morning. >>> david, i stole that cyborg a bit from your text. i thought it was useful. if we are going to call them people, the kind of people they are is not immoral but amoral, interested only in profits but willing to work with the law but in a ray that erodes what our capacities are. play that out for me. >> society is defined by its rules. what we have been doing quietly and without the news media covering it is rewriting the rules. the rules of competition are being thwarted or repealed. everyone in america has had a legal right to the telephone. you have to pay for it. that's been repealed in six. they can say, sorry, we are not going to serve you. >> i think the language has been about this $2,000. if we
that you trust is going to give you real information and support the kinds of laws that they're supporting rather than one that's maybe a bill posed by the industry that, guess what, wants to be self-regulating. okay, so now we are moving to the driveway, and this is really interesting because we think about low emissions cars as being really important for maybe climate change but they also might be important for breast cancer because when fuel is burning and you guys are familiar with chemicals that, you know, come bust, lower emissions vehicle, one that's more efficient may reduce these pah's in our air and especially in urban areas reduce exposures to those compounds which is really pornts, so thinking about hybrid or electric, we're all lucky enough to take public transit and reduce those overall exposures or -- yeah? >> i believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly th
chris 26 years ago at hastings law school, two blocks from here. we were in the same section in the same study group. when we finished law school we both went to the east coast to work for large law firms. over the years we stayed in close touch. when chris was back from over seas we were frequent tennis partners and would get together for dinners and other events in washington. over the years our families became friends as well. it's been such a pleasure to come to know them and chris's many friends in washington and to watch his career unfold. we met on the first day of school. i sat down in our civil procedure class next to a person who turned out to be named chris highland. shortly thereafter chris stevens sat down next to me. the three of us went to lunch afterwards and became friends from that day forward. chris never tried to be someone special but he was someone special. when we were at hastings his charm and wit were on display from the start. in class he was very articulate and seemed as later in life always very poised and well spoken and at ease. i think our professors loved
. smith: mr. speaker, h.r. 6620, the former presidents protection act of 2012, amends federal law to uniformerly provide lifetime secret service protection to all of america's former presidents. i want to thank the gentleman from south carolina, mr. gowdy, and the gentleman from virginia, mr. scott, for sponsoring this commonsense bipartisan legislation. america has a responsibility to protect its presidents and its families and not simply while they serve in office. we also have a duty to ensure the ongoing safety of those who serve in america's highest elected office after they leave office. in 1958 congress first authorized secret service protection for former presidents, which was limited to a reasonable period of time after a president leaves office. congress expanded this to lifetime protection in 1965. but in 1994, congress once again limited secret service protection for former presidents. this time to 10 years after a president leaves office. this 10-year restriction applied to presidents who took office after january 1, 1997. the role of the former president has changed
to tell her story. in carson city. >> he is one of the toughest law men in the west and probably the most politically polarizing. some san francisco students made that clear when they wrote to sheriff joe about his hard line immigration stance. he planned to answer them in person today but that never happened. cbs 5 recorder linda yee asked the questions instead. >> reporter: he's america's toughest sheriff. joe admits he courts controversy. >> welcome to san francisco. >> reporter: he got a dose of that when drag queens invaded his dinner party. the sheriff is in town for a convention. he hoped to reach out to eighth graders at a middle school who sent him letters. students wrote in spanish their disagreement with his fight against illegal immigrants and his tent prisons in the desert sun. >> they called may racist. i just wanted to meet with the kids and tell them the truth. >> reporter: he had to set the set the kids straight but the district canceled the meeting. the rep said she was too busy but denied there ever was a meeting. the sheriff defends arizona law that allows his deputies
to federal and state laws. one case involves the federal defense of marriage act, which denies federal benefits to same sex couples legally married in their own state. the other is a challenge to california's prop 8, which took away the right of same sex marriage that had been previously approved by state courts. >>> florida governor charlie crist completed his political transformation. crist was elected governor as a republican in 2006, then later ran for the senate as an independent. he campaigned for president obama, and spoke at the democratic national convention. he's now officially a democrat and is widely expected to run for governor again in 2014. >>> south africa's beloved nelson mandela is getting tests in a hospital. the country's president says no cause for alarm there. he says the 94-year-old mandela is getting tests consistent with his age. the nobel laureate became his nation's first black president. >>> the fbi wants to talk to a man in custody in egypt. he's a well known islamic extremist. that's why egypt wanted him taken down. but american terrorist watchers think he
legalized it within the last decade. washington's marijuana law makes it the only state that allows recreational pot use. by the way, colorado is just a couple of months away from enacting the very same freedoms. while it seems legal, is it really? those two states voted to make it so but the federal government still says it isn't so. quite frankly, nobody really knows who trumps who here in the political debate. the governors of both of those states say that the feds haven't even started talking to them yet. but how to reconcile these two laws that are diametrically opposed. the feds may be tipping their hands when and making plans for a bit after crackdown on these brand-new state freedoms. what the feds do could ultimately reverse what those states did. more likely what the state voters did which means that the supreme court may end up the ultimate referee in all of this. joining me now is the former u.s. attorney general in the bush administration, alberto gonzalez. probably one of the better voices to ask about what's happening. thank you so much for being on the program. did y
the law? well, let's consider the 14th amendment. nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property without due process of law nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protections of the laws. and here is justice kennedy, anthony kennedy, in his majority opinion in the lawrence case of 2003 which declared anti-sodomy laws unconstitutional. quote, does a statute making it a crime for two persons of the same sex to engage in certain intimate sexual conduct violate the due process clause? yes. a statute making it a crime for two persons of the same sex to engage in certain intimate sexual conduct violates the due process law. quote, liberty protects the person from unwarranted government intrusions. freedom extends upon spatial bounds. liberty presumes an autonomy of self that includes freedom of thought, belief, expression, and certain intimate conduct. the defendants are adults, and their conduct was in private and consensual, and, quote, to declare the issue as one related to the right to engage in certain sexual conduct demeans the claim the individual
should do it. i had never argued a case at the core, i had not been a law clerk at the court. >> did the president himself call you? >> he did. my phone wrong and it was ronald reagan an the phone. he said, sandra, i'd like to announce your nomination for the court tomorrow. frank lie my heart sang. >> really? >> it really did. because i was not at all sure that i could do the job well enough. i didn't know if i could. i told my husband and he said, oh, that's ridiculous, of course you can. and he was more certain and enthused than i was. >> then you came to washington and -- >> did i. >> do you think they treated you differently because you were a woman? >> well, they were very curious to meet me. those who didn't know me. number one, they were curious. number two, they weren't sure and number three, women are half of our voting population, aren't they? i think there was a certain hesitation on the part of elected officials to say, we can't have a woman, they didn't want to do that because they didn't know what affect that would have on voters. >> you think that in some ways they tr
. this is filling a big gap in state law in terms of administering an appeals process and in terms of noticing. there is quite a bit of commentary which, i'll restrain from going too much into in term of where it's coming from, that suggests that somehow this proposal is being consistent with state law. it is restating state law in a couple instances. but since this is essentially gap-filling legislation, it is not going beyond or inconsistent with state law. * i think the issue that you are most likely to get confused about, whether by confusion of the speakers or by deliberate representation -- misrepresentations by the speakers, is this issue of substantial evidence. and without going into a long legal treatise, there's two ways in which the term substantial evidence is used in c-e-q-a. one is an evidencery standard. one is an appellate standard. * the way in which this is introduced in this legislation has to do with evidence and very simply, if you want to make a case for conclusion, whether you is the city or you is the appellant, you need to substantial evident to support it. that's all
had a constitutional law here, i'm not sure that it is hour is the best use. the attorney general did do a law-enforcement bulletin; the issue is whether the local jurisdiction is obligated to use state resources to do a federal detainer; it is specific to the sheriff's department. part of the notion is that it is not the job ofrom my law enforcement to enforce immigration policy; we are here to keep people safe. we appreciate the chief's passion. and ultimately where people come is not relevant and using this forum is important to underscore that commitment, and i'm glad the chief is clear and unequivocal about that. >> victims are not at risk for deportation. that is abundantly clear from what the chief has said. our next line item is regarding the san francisco police department special victims unit. >> i would like to introduce deputy director, lisa hoffman, waiting to tell you about the new system. >> sorry about that. >> good evening and thyo for letting me have a moment to speak. i will keep it brief. we have beein the rocess after procuring enough that you the cur
constitutional challenges to same-sex marriage laws. if the court were to follow public opinion, the decision could come down in favor of gay and lesbian couples. recent polling shows 53% of americans think same-sex marriage should be legal. 46% say illegal. and on election day, voters in three states approved same-sex marriage. "outfront," mckay coppins, tim carney and maria cardona, cnn contributor and democratic strategist. this is kind of big news in all of this. tim, you saw the polls. now the supreme court will get involved in this. should this signal something to the republican party? should they say it's reached this level, we need to rethink our position on this? >> polls are one thing. there's also the fact most states don't have gay marriage yet and most of those that do, it was not put in by the will of the people. i'm a marylander. we did -- our state did vote for gay marriage. most of them had to do with judges ruling. if the supreme court does for gay marriage what it did for abortion and roe v. wade and said, no, this is not in the hands of the people. we're going to say there
on the constitutionality of same-sex marriage. law professor jonathan terly has all the details. >> thanks for watching. john boehner isn't having a lot of fun this holiday season. president obama continues his pressure campaign to pass the tax cuts. the president is also taking time to be fesive. john boehner doesn't sound so merry. >> no progress report because there's no progress to report. when it comes to the fis e call cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> the phone call was pleasant, but was just more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday, just more of the same. it's time for the president if he's serious to come back to us with a counteroffer. >> even though the president apparently designed the negotiating sessions at boehner's request. according to "the new york times," boehner insisted the talks include only himself and the president of the united states. boehner wanted senate democrats and nancy pelosi out of the discussions. democratic senator dick durbin told the times this is now the speaker and the pr
. the governors made it clear he's ready to make it law. that would make michigan, which is considered the birth place of organized labor, the 24th right to work state. >>> for a second straight day, growing outrage in egypt as protesters attacked president mohamed morsi's house. and others demonstrate in tahrir square. a live report on the protests right after this. [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus presents the cold truth. i have a cold... i took dayquil, but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't work on runny noses. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have an antihistamine. really? [ male announcer ] really. alka-seltzer plus cold and cough fights your worst cold symptoms, plus has a fast acting antihistamine to relieve your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] can't find theraflu? try alka-seltzer plus for fast, liquid, cold, and flu relief. [ male announcer ] are you on medicare? do you have the coverage you need?
rest on our way out of this problem. i no longer want to hear those words. this is not to give the law- enforcement a short shrift. i have had an impact on my husband's life, some of the unwanted. but he has had an impact on mind. i have done extensive work with law enforcement, with the lapd and the los angeles county sheriff's. i am here to tell you that crime has been driven down in los angeles because of their efforts, but not only because of their efforts. so what does the collaboration look like. i want you to keep some ideas in mind. there is no first among equals. what we learned in los angeles was that oppression alone was not the answer. it did not work. there were record highs in gang violence in 2005. i want to tell you what has happened between 2005 and 2012. number one, the grass roots -- the disorganize, fragmented, passionate grass roots must be part of this. the community members who go to county supervisors meetings, the members who pass out fliers, the youths who have been in the juvenile justice system that are now part of the coalition -- those individuals must hav
it was in bad taste and ill-judged that any laws were broken by his two deejays making this prank call, so, again, a lot of sadness and regret being expressed. >> hard to imagine that it has taken the turn that it has. matthew chance, thank you very much. >>> the supreme court is stepping right into the middle of the same-sex marriage debate. the justices have decided to hear two important cases which will no doubt have major ramifications. cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns has a look for us. >> reporter: randi, after weeks of speculation, the court decided to take up two cases on the issue of same-sex marriage. the first one is about the defense of marriage act, windsor against the united states. edith windsor and her partner were married in toronto, canada in 2007. spire died in 2009 in new york at a time when new york recognized same-sex marriages that had been performed outside the side. when spire died windsor was required to pay $363,000 in federal estate taxes on her inheritance that she would not have had to pay if federal law had given their relationship the same sta
their daughters and mothers and fatherss in laws and fathers. kill them slow low and painfully. to be fair in korean it sounded lovely. psy is scheduled to perform at a charity concert called christmas in washington on sunday with the president and first family expected to attend. impeachment if you ask me. and surprise, surprise he has now apologized telling mtv news, i have learned there are limits to what language is appropriate and deeply sorry for how these lyrics can be interpreted. i will be forever sorry for any pain i have caused anyone by those words. whatever. some are calling for the christmas concert to replace psy with a performance by spin kitty. >> the weird thing is there are photos of spin kitty hanging out with al-qaeda. we can't use that either. all right, where am i? gavin are you shocked that psy ended up being another musician with very, very inflammatory beliefs? >> what a lot of people don't get about korean culture is they see protest as emulating america. they worship us. look at how many christians are over there. they worship a white god. >> i did not know that
jihadist. 45 years old with a master's in sharia law. after the down fall of hasni mubarak he was released from jail and is believed to with be behind a terror group seeking to align with al qaeda. now achmed allegedly confessed to traveling to libya and having joined the resistance there. but an egyptian official said he denied any connection to the attack on the u.s. consulate or affiliation for al qaeda. at the time he was arrested he was armed with two machine guns. he's believed to be connected to a terror cell called the nasr city cell. when it was taken down there was a huge stockpile of weapons including rocket-propelled grenades, explosive belts and investigators have work to do now to figure out his suspected role in the u.s. consulate attack. >> the denials are interesting. thanks, susan. i know you will stay on top of that. next march the u.s. supreme court is expected to tackle laws governing same-sex marriage. it will hear two arguments, one involves the constitutionality of the defense of marriage act which denies federal benefits to same sex spouses. the case was brought by
to kids, and then we have to see these changes with the laws so if fda has proposals out for medical imaging around kids so you know how to downsize a radiation dose for kids who is smaller, their physical size is narrower, and also to make machines more accountable and more clear in how they work. >> [inaudible]. >> it's very low doses but that's an excellent question and i thought somebody would probably ask that. so, the united states preventative services task force in 2009 came out with a proposal to revise guidelines saying that perhaps women aged 40 to 50, there's no cost benefit really for that age group in terms of having mammogram of average risk, so recommended that women start mammography at age ao where the benefits really out weigh the risk, you don't have 40 years left in your life span at that point perhaps, you have 30, you're at a less vulnerable stage of life so there are a lot more benefits for life, your breast cancer risks are higher, so you know, the age 40 to 50, there's still a lot of debate about that and women need to discuss this with their own health care
conflict with state law and increase rather than reduce the city's exposure to c-e-q-a litigation and specifically i'm talking about confusing and unnecessarily complex processes for providing notice of c-e-q-a exemption determinations. under the proposed amendment, members of the public must submit written materials regarding an appeal to the board one full day before the city is required to give notice of the appeal. in other words, you have to give your written materials are due before member of the public are informed that an appeal is happening. the proposed amendments would deem valid prior c-e-q-a approval actions which could force project appellants to file lawsuits even before the board reaches decisions on their appeals in order to avoid c-e-q-a's strict statute of limitations. this could subject the city to additional and unnecessary expensive litigation. and finally, the proposed amendments would force members of the public to file two appeals and pay two appeal fees of $500 each in order to seek review proposed negative declarations before the board of supervisors. i
says he acted reasonable and consistently with the law. >> and in order for mr. mezerilee to be on the lawsuit in that shooting the court has to have determined his conduct shocked the conscience. my argument that that is not the case here. >> a ruling is not expected for at least two months. >> a special visitor in san francisco tonight to eat eet a little humble pie. abc 7 news is live tonight at the home of world series champion san francisco giants. hi, carolyn. nice to have the mayor in town. >> yes. both mayors have mustaches and being encouraged to shave if they're on the losing end of the deal. both declined to do that. detroit dave bing was a good sport today. he said he was trying to be honorable in defeat. detroit mayor and first lady, dave and eve yet bing arrived ready for him to take good on a losing bet. >> are you here under dures? >> absolutely. but it's history now. as a former athlete i respect what happened. i didn't like it from the detroit status point but giants played a wonderful series. >> and the mayor ed lee has bragging rights. what do you think
evidence is the most useful. we have a standard in criminal law called the reasonable person standard. this fictitious person that we measure everybody's conduct by. we say this is the person, the average person, the average juror, the average individual, the kind of conduct that we would expect an average member of society to live up to. well, as it turns out that none of us are quite average, right. and we might actually be much more like people who we share particular brain structures with or people who we share particular environmental and brain similarities to. so we might need to start thinking about more particularized notions of conduct based on what we would expect of a person who has that type of brain structure who had these types of environmental factors and then start to think about how we want to treat them. do we want to hold those people responsible for their actions or less responsible for their actions. are there certain people who would be better subject to medical treatment instead of incarceration. are there certainly people who we actually think would be
on the bill they just debated, changing federal energy efficiency laws. we'll take you live next to the capital, the chair and co-chair of the democratic caucus, just starting a briefing talking about the fiscal cliff and jobs. it's live here on c-span. >> and continues to preach the kind of message that i think the nation needs, one of compromise but one of assurity that we are going to be looking out tore the interest of the middle class and the protection of social security, medicare and medicaid for the people who are in such desperate need of those great programs that are the hallmark of our country. we have repeatedly said and our caucus again just confirmed that job creation equals deficit reduction, and we must put the country back to work. we have proposals that are on the floor. we still believe that even with the -- what little time remains and what little time remains when we're actually working, this is still possible. this is still doable. this is not a democrat or republican issue. republicans believe that america needs to go back to work. it's just a matter of hav
asked today is it the case of the law that you have to release a 9/1 9/11 dash 911 tape like this or do they keep them private? >> andrea: if a request is made, subpoena to the tape and get reporting they are allowed to because it's part of the public record. once you do the proper steps you can get it. certain case, judge or prosecutor is pending, which we don't have here, because everybody is deceased that was involved in it. they can block it and say it's in the best interest to keep this sealed or out of the public domain. you can imagine a situation like to is very traumatic. this little girl is going to grow up knowing that her father murdered her mother. this tape is out there. it will be on the web. >> dana: any other thoughts about this before we move on? >> greg: it will change the behavior. if you know it will be released, that is the problem. it may prevent people from calling. i never like having them released. if you at a party and someone is in trouble maybe you won't call because you don't want to be involved. >> bob: good point. good point. >> dana: all right. let's mov
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 472 (some duplicates have been removed)